10-Minute Interview with Macdonald Dick II, MD

Macdonald Dick II, MD
Macdonald Dick II, MD
Dr. Dick has been a member of the faculty and staff of the University of Michigan Health System since 1977. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Pediatrics (both pediatrics and pediatric cardiology), a fellow in the American College of Cardiology, and a member of the American Pediatric Society and the Society for Pediatric Research. He is active in the development of pediatric cardiac electrophysiology and in the application of radiofrequency energy for the treatment of arrhythmias in children. He is a published author of articles regarding the diagnosis and management of heart disease and arrhythmias in children. Why did you choose to work in the field of electrophysiology? Two reasons. At the time, in the very early 1970's, the translation from the research lab into the clinical arena was just underway (actually re-emerging after a long period of relative inactivity), and I was young, looking for a interesting focus. What research activities or clinical trials in pediatric EP is the University of Michigan currently involved in? Some of our clinical trials include the assessment of ablation in children and the prevention of atrial arrhythmias following a Fontan operation. What is your best piece of advice to give to others in the field of pediatric medicine? Make sure you like what you do, but be ready and flexible to change when necessary. What was the most bizarre or difficult case you have ever been involved in? I remember an infant with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, supraventricular tachycardia, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation, and aborted sudden death x3, perhaps aggrevated by digoxin. There were several other memorable cases as well, such as a newborn who had both  transient heart block (2nd degree) and wide QRS tachycardia (a sine wave). I could go on. What changes do you think will occur in the field of electrophysiology in the coming decade? Some changes I think we'll see include improved mapping and imaging methods, improved energy sources, and pharmacogenomics.